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Texas A&M Study Shows Severe Air Pollution Can Cause Birth Defects, Deaths

Posted by Rypos on Jun 21, 2019 10:00:00 AM

In a comprehensive study, researchers from Texas A&M University have determined that harmful particulate matter in the atmosphere can produce birth defects and even fatalities during pregnancy using the animal model.

The team of researchers from Texas A&M's Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Geosciences, the Texas A&M Health Science Center, and colleagues from the University of California-San Diego has had their findings published in the current issue of PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences).

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Tags: Polution, Child Health

A New View of Wintertime Air Pollution

Posted by Peter Bransfield on May 31, 2019 1:35:00 PM

The processes that create ozone pollution in the summer can also trigger the formation of wintertime air pollution, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and NOAA, in partnership with the University of Utah. The team's unexpected finding suggests that in the U.S. West and elsewhere, certain efforts to reduce harmful wintertime air pollution could backfire.

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Tags: Polution, Research

The When, Where and What of Air Pollutant Exposure

Posted by Peter Bransfield on Nov 15, 2018 10:00:00 AM

Scientists have linked air pollution with many health conditions including asthma, heart disease, lung cancer and premature death. Among air pollutants, fine particulate matter is especially harmful because the tiny particles (diameter of 2.5 μm or less) can penetrate deep within the lungs. Now, researchers have integrated data from multiple sources to determine the personal exposure of people in peri-urban India to fine particulate matter. They report their results in Environmental Science & Technology.

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Tags: Polution, World Health Organization

Air Pollution and Child Health: Prescribing Clean Air

Posted by Peter Bransfield on Oct 31, 2018 8:58:00 PM
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Tags: Polution, WHO, Child Health

CARB Expected to OK Tougher Smoke Opacity Limits in May

Posted by Peter Bransfield on Apr 30, 2018 7:00:00 AM

California environmental regulators are scheduled next month to consider changes that would toughen state standards on smoke opacity as well as require motor carriers with two or more trucks to report to the agency the results from an annual smoke self-test.

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Tags: Polution, CARB, Regulation